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Monroe County COVID-19 Information Click Here

 

COVID-19 NOTICE

UF/IFAS is here to help! While we are currently open to the public by appointment only, or
you can get the support you need via email, phone, or our social media sites.

We look forward to working with you, and please stay safe!

Attention:

UF/IFAS Extension places the highest priority on the safety and health of our community members, staff and volunteers. To help stem the coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic, our office is currently open to the public by appointment only and all in-person programs have been moved online. We are still here to serve you by phone or email and you can find information for programs and contact staff members on this web site.

UF/IFAS Extension
Monroe County

The Monroe County Extension Office is dedicated toward serving Monroe County by providing objective information to individuals, businesses, and agencies for better decision making and by creating programs and services that provide learning opportunities that empower people to improve their lives.

Contact

monroe@ifas.ufl.edu
(305) 292-4501
1100 Simonton St. Ste. 2-260
Key West, FL 33040

Hours

Monday - Friday
8am - 5pm

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New Snail Pest in Miami-Dade County
The Horntail Snail, Macrochlamys indica, was detected in Miami-Dade County in August 2020 and sent to the University of Florida for identification. This identification was confirmed by USDA and Florida Department of Agriculture (FDACS), Division of Plant Industry

10/05/2020

What's Going on Near You

COVID-19 and UF/IFAS Extension
Updated 03/16/20 As we continue to monitor COVID-19 in Florida, I wanted to take a moment to update our UF/IFAS Extension community about our current status, best practices and next steps. Please call your local UF/IFAS Extension office or view the local update page for the most up to date information on your

03/15/2020

Roselle, The Florida Cranberry
Roselle, a relative of hibiscus, was once used widely as an edible plant in Florida. The flowers are less showy than other hibiscus varieties, but their calyces (sepals at the base of the flower) are amazing! As the flower dies the calyx gets fleshy and in the sunlight shines like rubies

04/03/2020

Study: For monarch butterflies, plant variety is the spice of life
As monarch butterflies make their transcontinental migration this month across North America, they will depend on milkweed plants to produce the next generation of this iconic butterfly species, which has seen declines of more than 80% in its eastern population and 99% in its western population. However, a new University of Florida study suggests that adding other flowering plants to the mix may help monarchs more than milkweed alone

10/15/2020

Termite Swarms
With the start of rainy season upon us, it also means residents will begin to see termite swarms, specifically West Indian drywood termites (Cryptotermes brevis). Here in the Florida Keys we have two economically damaging termites, Asian subterranean termites (Coptotermes gestroi) and West Indian drywood termites

05/13/2020

Everglades Tomato-A Summer Tomato for the Keys
Also known locally as wild tomato or currant tomato, the Everglades tomato is a wonder for gardeners in the Florida Keys. The tomato blooms and fruits all year long, is tolerant of our alkaline soil, brackish water, salt winds, and is resistant to such fungal diseases as verticillium and fusarium wilts, and late blight (Razali et al

04/20/2020

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    Roselle, The Florida Cranberry
    Roselle, a relative of hibiscus, was once used widely as an edible plant in Florida. The flowers are less showy than other hibiscus varieties, but their calyces (sepals at the base of the flower) are amazing! As the flower dies the calyx gets fleshy and in the sunlight shines like rubies

    04/03/2020

    This Thanksgiving: Waste Not!
    The Farm Bureau’s annual Thanksgiving price survey estimates that Thanksgiving Day accounts for $282 million of uneaten turkeys that end up in the trash. Added to our overall food consumption, we throw away 34 million tons of food each year

    11/26/2019